Monday, April 10, 2017

Take the 4th Annual Community Survey!

Yep, it's that time of year again! And given how much our community has grown in the past year, I'm really excited to see what happens. Really hoping we'll be able to beat our former record of 72 responses! (We collected a few more after I posted last year's results.) It'll only take a minute, and it'll help us tremendously!

Please take the Open Steno Project Community Survey 4.0!

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Stenotoppers: 3D Printed Keys for Your Mechanical Keyboard!

The most exciting recent news in the Open Steno sphere is Jason's new Stenotoppers models, which you can print on any 3D printer (or have printed for you by a 3D printing shop, though that can get pricey), to turn your staggered-layout mechanical keyboard with steno-unfriendly beveled keytoppers into an ortholinear steno-style layout with smooth interfaces between rows.



It works with any Cherry or Gateron switches (I recommend clears/whites if you're in the market, since they have the lowest actuation force) and is entirely free to download and modify. If you have a mechanical keyboard and a 3D printer or access to one via your local makerspace, this is a great robust alternative to our laser-cut acrylic keytoppers, which are sometimes a little fiddly to align. Please note that these are unfortunately not compatible with the Zalman NKRO keyboard, which at $45 is the cheapest solution for entry level steno. Most mechanical keyboards with compatible switches are in the $100 to $150 range, so budget accordingly.

Speaking of which, if you'd rather just buy an ortholinear keyboard at the outset, the Planck is currently available on Massdrop for another 5 days. I have one, built and donated to me by the fantastic Scott of SOFT/HRUF fame, and it's quite a nice little machine. A little clickier than my beloved StenoMod, and somewhat bulkier than the sleek and compact SOFT/HRUF, but a very strong contender in the dual qwerty/steno keyboard bracket. Even better, the firmware comes with a Plover layer built right in. You'll have to assemble it yourself, but I've been told it's not terribly difficult, even for beginners.

The Plover README file has been updated to include recent developments in the Open Steno community.

Finally, there's a new expanded StenoJig landing page that allows you to customize your drills in a more flexible way without editing the URLs as you had to do previously. Extremely convenient!

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Plover 3.1.1 Released

This is a minor bug fix release affecting Linux and Mac users.
  • Fix a certain type of NKRO on Linux (#644)
  • Fix control key on macOS Sierra not working with global shortcuts
  • Fix an edge case of output for Mac, where certain keys wouldn't be shifted
Check out the release on GitHub.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Plover Beginner's Guide

This is a bit overdue, but we now have an excellent Beginner's Guide to Getting Started With Plover over on the new wiki, which has supplanted the old outdated stenoknight.com wiki. It's got step-by-step instructions on setting Plover up and trying it out for the first time, as well as hardware advice and links to learning and practice resources. Many thanks to Ted and Ellis for the writing and editing work!

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Come To The Discord Group! Meet Stenobot!

So I've pretty much dissolved the Aviary. I just couldn't keep the spammers out, and I froze the board to new posts, and it had very low traffic anyway. All the real Plover community action these days is on the Discord group, which is basically like updated IRC, or a more open Slack. It's great, and we've got a fantastic group of people, with wide-ranging conversations on steno and virtually everything else under the sun. Also, as of this week, we have a new member:



Ted whipped us up a bot called StenoBot, who displays all steno code written between backticks on the Learners channel (and on other channels if you start the line with !). It's very cool.

Come check it out at the Discord Group!

Saturday, January 28, 2017

New Gutenberg Sentence Drills at Steno Jig!

Check out all the new sentence drills featuring only common English words, extracted from public domain texts! There are a total of 80 of them so far. The URL above links to number 80; just change that number in the address bar to get each of the rest of them.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Timeline of the OSP and New Steno Jig Exercises

First off, Ted has compiled a rough timeline of the Open Steno Project from its inception through the present day. Useful for people who want to put the whole trajectory of Open Steno in context.

Also, Steno Jig (a link to which you can find on the learning resources page on the new Github-based Plover wiki, which has superseded the old outdated Wiki), has a new fork by Jason which uses sentences from Project Gutenberg containing the most used words in the English language. Great if you're looking for realistic practice material without too many esoteric words to wade through!